Apple, Samsung and Google under fire at Mobile World Congress

The smartphone industry's three dominant leaders were put on notice this week in Barcelona: It's a new world now.

By , Computerworld |  Mobile & Wireless

The HTC One is by far the most beautifully designed Android phone I've ever seen, with its elegant, unibody aluminum construction.

The HTC One challenges the iPhone on Apple's own terms -- with elegant hardware design, a fantastic camera and a compelling user interface.

Apple's monopoly on elegant hardware design is officially over.

An even bigger threat to Apple's dominance, however, is the general excitement over phones totally unlike iPhones.

The hottest thing in smartphones at the show was raw power: 13-megapixel cameras, blistering-fast mobile processors, giant screens, incredibly loud and clear speaker systems and surprising and innovative connectivity options to TVs and other devices.

The iPhone suddenly feels stale and feeble.

Samsung

Samsung had an enormous booth, as usual, but didn't announce its upcoming Galaxy S4 phone, which will be unveiled March 14 in New York.

Samsung's new handset competitors are hitting the company with a combination of great design, compelling features and raw power.

Huawei's Ascend P2 features blistering fast performance not only with onboard, quad-core 1.5GHz processing, but also LTE connectivity offering theoretical 150 Mbps download speeds.

LG demonstrated some surprising technology that I didn't think was even possible. They showed an LG Optimus G running a graphically intensive game mirrored over HDMI and upscaled to Ultra HD TV (also known as 4K) -- a TV technology so new that they're selling for around $20,000 per TV set. Hollywood isn't even producing much 4K content.

ZTE surprised the MWC crowd by announcing a phone called the Grand Memo running Qualcomm's Snapdragon 800 processor with LTE connectivity -- which can run at a clock speed of 2.3 GHz. (Note that Samsung's upcoming most-powerful phone, the Galaxy S4, will reportedly run the slower Snapdragon 600 in one model for the U.S., and a second version running Samsung's eight-core Exynos 5 Octa chip for the European market.)


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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