Galaxy S 4 cheat sheet with less than six hours to launch

Software features, not hardware, appears to be Samsung's big focus for new smartphone

By , Computerworld |  Mobile & Wireless

Samsung's Galaxy S 4 will be unveiled tonight in New York City. Judging from various leaks, reports, rumors and official tweeted photos, Samsung will focus heavily on new software features when it unveils the Galaxy S 4 smartphone tonight in New York City.

The event promises to be a spectacle attended by hundreds of reporters and analysts and will be live-streamed here and on Youtube.

Based on an official Galaxy S 4 photo tweeted by Samsung on Tuesday, the new device looks very similar to the Galaxy S III, even though the mysterious photo tweeted by Samsung Mobile US shows only the top one-third of the device.

If a new slick look for the device is indeed not Samsung's next direction, look for software features that enhance the user experience, like eye-tracking technology, to be Samsung's biggest focus for the GS4.

Trademarked "Eye Scroll" technology will reportedly use the smartphone's front-facing camera to track eye movements so that as the eye moves down the screen, the software knows to scroll up the Web page being read.

Samsung already supports Smart Stay software in the GSIII that uses the front-facing camera to keep the screen lit up when a person is looking at it, rather than dimming to save power.

A series of four new videos posted Thursday by PhoneDog.com show variations on touchless interactions, such as floating touch, Smart Pause and new ways to interact with the phone's browser, on the Galaxy S 4.

Floating touch appears to let a user hold a finger over a photo thumbnail to expand its size, rather than actually touching the screen. The effect appears to be much the same as mousing over an image on some desktop Web pages.

SmartPause detects when a user is not looking at the device screen, and then automatically pause a video being played. The video resumes when the user looks at the screen again.

Also in the latest videos are demonstrations of how a user can move around a page by moving his hand around in front of the display without touching it.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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