5 mini projectors: A show wherever you go

Need to give a quick presentation or want to show a movie to your friends? One of these five compact projectors will do the trick.

By Jake Widman, Computerworld |  Mobile & Wireless

When I projected an image on a wall 10 feet away, the image was more than 6 feet wide, plenty big for watching at home. The Qumi Q5 even offers the kinds of presets for showing movies, games or presentations that you find on HDTVs.

Bottom line

The Q5 is the top performer in this roundup, packing a ton of features and a high-quality display into a small, portable package. Its only real disadvantage (besides its price) is that it doesn't have a battery, but even the cord and power brick are relatively light and compact.

3M Mobile Projector MP410

$599 (list), $452 - $805 (retail)

It seems kind of unfair to criticize the MP410. It's got perfectly fine specs at a perfectly reasonable price. It's just hard to get excited about.

There's nothing to complain about when it comes to the MP410's performance. At 300 lumens, it's the second-brightest projector in the bunch; it also has one of the highest resolutions at 1280 x 800.

The movie from the DVD player looked clear and had good color, and the presentation on the iPad was adequately sharp. Like the Qumi, it was able to project a 6-foot-wide image on a wall 10 feet away.

3M Mobile Projector MP410

The MP410 has 1GB of built-in storage; it can also read data from a USB drive and is one of the two devices in this roundup that can accept a micro SD card. Like the Q5, it handles a reasonable selection of file formats, such as JPEG and BMP images; MOV, MP4, AVI and DIVX video; and MP3 and WMA audio. It doesn't come with a remote, but you can buy one separately for about $25 - $30.

An old-fashioned design

But it's the little things that keep the MP410 a runner-up, starting with the design. Where the other projectors in this roundup are sleek and smooth, obviously influenced by current trends in gadget design, the MP410 looks like a device engineered in the '90s. It's got a cheap-looking brushed-silver plastic top with blocky square buttons. And while the Qumi Q5 reacts when you attach a new source and asks if you want to switch to it, the MP410 just waits for you to tell it what to do.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question