Dual persona smartphones non grata at Starz

MDM policies should focus on personal, not technical issues, entertainment company finds

By , Computerworld |  Mobile & Wireless

For example, executives who travel overseas as well as salespeople who travel domestically mostly get a corporate iPhone because they tend to work well for media presentation, Batenburg said. Technical staff who are on call typically get Android phones because they're well suited to support interactive communications.

Batenburg admitted Starz didn't get its BYOD strategy right the first time around. It focused on the technology instead of employees.

"This is not a technical problem," Batenburg said.

Instead, BYOD is a personal employee issue that's highly dependent on what the needs of any particular employee are. Companies must focus on how a strategy better enables an employee to do his or her job.

Batenburg said in any evolution toward a BYOD strategy there are typically five stages:

  • Denial that it's going to happen.
  • Ignore BYOD (even when mobile devices are accessing your servers.)
  • Allow BYOD, but don't encourage it.
  • Encourage and incentivize BYOD.
  • Insist on BYOD and mandate it

"We're actually discussing from the encourage to the insist stage. I don't think we'll ever get to the point where we have no corporate devices. It's just not happening in our world," Batenburg said. "If you're going to do this, you just have to find a way to manage the chaos it brings. And, it is a chaotic disruption to the IT world."

One piece of advice Batenburg offered fellow IT managers is to not choose a mobile device management (MDM) software product based on popularity. There simply is no best MDM product in the market, she said. There is only what's best for your company.

Companies first need to create a list of must haves from an MDM product, and then purchase the software that best suits those requirements.

For example, at Starz, the ability to secure corporate data, wipe data when a phone is lost or stolen, track mobile devices, enforce corporate policies and perform electronic discovery of corporate content was key.

"BYOD is happening. The fuse is lit. We're taking off," Batenburg said. "The best we can do is hope to steer it in the direction that makes sense for you and your company."


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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