A wearable PC that could benefit the disabled

In today's accessible technology roundup: Japan develops a wearable computer controlled by facial expressions, a high school student is engineering solutions to improve the web for the color blind and the EU wants to make government websites accessible

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Photo of a man with one eyebrow raised

A new wearable PC from Japan can be controlled with facial expressions like raising an eyebrow

Image credit: flickr/Jeremy Keith

Wearable computers seem to be the next big thing and researchers in Japan have created one that may benefit those who don't have use of their hands: a PC that clips onto your ear and can be controlled by facial expressions.

Here are some other recent news items and information about the development of accessible technology:

  • When doing user research and testing, do you include disabled people? Sarah Horton recently wrote about why it's a smart idea.

  • An Indian high school student is raising money to develop image optimization algorithms to better adjust color schemes online for the benefit of color blind people.

  • Last month, the European Parliament endorsed a draft law to require that websites managed by public sector entities are fully accessible; currently, only 26% of European government websites meet WCAG 2.0 standards. It's now up to member countries to adopt the law.

  • Microsoft's Jay Munro wrote last week about how to use HTML5's track element to add closed caption tracks to videos.

  • On the accessibility tech hiring front, Microsoft's Customer Services and Support team is looking to fill eight new positions on its accessibility team, while CNIB (formerly the Canadian National Institute for the Blind) is looking for a Web Developer & Accessibility Specialist.

Read more of Phil Johnson's #Tech blog and follow the latest IT news at ITworld. Follow Phil on Twitter at @itwphiljohnson. For the latest IT news, analysis and how-tos, follow ITworld on Twitter and Facebook.

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