Why aren't you using MightyText for Android?

Want to send a text message from your laptop or desktop, using your real number? The answer is a free app.

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Use all your hands, not just the thumbs, to text real people from your real number.

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I have a question for you, person who owns an Android phone: Why aren't you using MightyText?

I mean, there is a chance you already are using MightyText. MightyText reports more than 4 million users on its homepage, backed up by the Google Play Store report of "1,000,000-5,000,000" installs (quite the range). And I certainly heard from MightyText fans on Twitter and Google+ when I wrote about Android apps that move text messages to your laptop or desktop at Greenbot (an IDG publication, like this one).

But I get this sense that there are plenty of people who might get a lot of value out of MightyText who aren't yet using it. And more's the pity, because MightyText is a truly useful and clever utility for your Android phone, one that you can't believe works as well and as seamlessly as it does.

Why do I insist you use MightyText? Because I get this sense that sometimes you'd rather read, send, and reply to text messages from your laptop or desktop keyboard, using your actual cellphone number. It takes less time because it doesn't require picking up your phone, turning it on, unlocking it, heading to the messaging app, and typing with a tiny keyboard. And you probably make far fewer errors on a full 10-finger keyboard than with your two thumbs. Sometimes, too, you need to charge your phone. And some bosses are not so keen on seeing employees hunched over their phones.

Once you install MightyText on your Android phone and then browser, and you connect both phone and browser to the same Google account, it is working. You can open up MightyText's webapp and see your text messages, laid out in either a vertical list or a "power grid." You can send new messages to contacts already loaded through your phone's synced address book. You can reply to messages as they come in, and on modern browsers that allow web-based notifications, you can often reply without leaving the page you're on.

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