How to find anything in Evernote: 6 advanced search tips

Evernote's notes and notebooks are great until you have too many of them, too stuffed with stuff

By Alex Castle, PC World |  Mobile & Wireless

When it comes to taking notes, you can't beat Evernote. With its mobile apps and browser plug-ins, it's incredibly easy to take any article, image, or other data and add it to your personal collection. It's so easy, in fact, that it often takes less time to add a note than to decide whether you really need it. Before you know it, you've got way more info than you know what to do with.

So what are you supposed to do when it comes time to find one of your notes? Manually browsing through them is akin to rifling through a file drawer. Instead, hone in on what you're looking for using Evernote's advanced search operators. These modifiers let you find notes based on where or when they were created, which notebook they're filed in, or even what type of media they contain. Here are the most useful operators for narrowing your searches.

Keyword searches

You can get a lot more from keyword search if you know when to use the any: operator. By default, Evernote shows only the notes that include all the  keywords in your search. If you'd like to expand your search, put the any: operator before your  keywords, and Evernote will show you every note that contains even a single one. For example, the following search will show you all notes with the word "invoice" or "expense."

Tags and Notebooks

You can search a specific notebook by including the notebook: operator at the beginning of your search. For instance, the following search will look only for meeting notes from your "Office and work" notebook. If a term includes a space, you can surround it with quotation marks to make Evernote understand it as a single keyword:

If you know a keyword is included as a tag in the note you're seeking and don't want to see notes that include that keyword as body text, use the tag: operator. Both the notebook: and tag: operators can be negated by putting a hyphen (-)  in front of them. The following search will find notes including "article," but that don't have the "draft" tag:

Time frame

You can search for notes created or updated during a certain time period using the created: or updated: operators. Both of these must be followed immediately by a date in the YYYYMMDD format. They will show all notes created after the specified time, and they can be negated to show notes created before a certain date. Combine both to specify a certain date range, as in the following example search for a Fourth of July itinerary:

Location


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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