Comcast: We will meet our IPv6 deadline

By , Network World |  Networking, IPv6

Comcast says it will meet its 2012 deadline of transitioning its network to support IPv6, the long anticipated upgrade to the Internet's main communications schedule. The ISP is halfway through a nine-month public trial of IPv6 that has attracted 7,000 of its business and residential customers nationwide.

Feds' IPv6 plan called a "game changer"

Comcast will reach another milestone in its IPv6 trial this week, when it releases open source code that will allow home gateways to translate between IPv6 and the current standard, known as IPv4.

Comcast also says it will soon begin the next phase of its trial, which involves running IPv6 and IPv4 side-by-side in what's called a dual-stack configuration for the cable industry telecommunication standards known as DOCSIS.

Overall, Comcast says it is on schedule with its IPv6 trial, which began in April and will continue through the end of the year.

"I wouldn't say IPv6 is easy, but it's not impossibly difficult either," says Jason Livingood, executive director of Internet systems engineering at Comcast. "IPv6 is something you have to start working on and plugging away at day by day to understand the technical issues, the bugs and the systems integration problems. If you uncover the problems early, you can fix them while you still have time."

Carriers such as Comcast are upgrading to IPv6 because the Internet is running out of IPv4 address space.

IPv4 uses 32-bit addresses and can support 4.3 billion devices connected directly to the Internet. IPv6, on the other hand, uses 128-bit addresses and supports a virtually unlimited number of devices -- 2 to the 128th power.

The regional Internet registries said in early September that less than 6% of IPv4 addresses remain unallocated. Experts say IPv4 addresses could run out as early as this December but will certainly be gone by the end of 2011.

The need for U.S. carriers and corporations to upgrade to IPv6 was highlighted yesterday by the White House, which issued a directive requiring all federal agencies to support IPv6 on their public facing Web sites by fall 2012.


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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