Industry upbeat about IPv6 Day despite low traffic volume

Internet 2.0 tried out for a day

By John E. Dunn, IDG News Service |  Networking, IPv6

"The day has shown that if you turn IPv6 on the world will not collapse," said Robert Kisteleki, R&D manager for RIPE NCC, who has judged the day a proof of concept success. "Virtually all users will still be able to connect."

In Kisteleki's view, the "The critical points are the 'eyeball' networks," the large Content Delivery Networks (CDNs) that host the content Internet valued by ordinary Internet users. "Many of the CDNs may just decide to leave IPv6 turned on. If that happens we will not need another IPv6 Day," he said.

Individual users can run the Internet Society's test suite of IPv6 readiness to check their own ability to reach IPv6 sites. Most users will fail on some of the tests that measure an ISP's ability to handle IPv6 requests, especially in relation to native DNS requests.

A less ambitious test is available from RIPE NCC's site, which measures whether a user's PC can reach what are called "dual-stacked" IPv4/IPv6 sites from a list of large companies participating in the test. Everyone connecting through a mainstream ISP should pass this test.

The lessons learned from Wednesday's test, if any, will be offered to the industry at next week's IPv6 World Congress in London.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question
randomness