IETF mulls IPv6 for home networking

The proposed IETF Homenet group would select protocols for use in tomorrow's home networks

By , IDG News Service |  Networking, IPv6

The Internet Engineering Task Force is considering establishing a working group to smooth some of the impending issues around setting up and maintaining IPv6-based Internet connections into homes.

"A collection of protocols needs to be agreed upon, so vendors of equipment used in home networks will have an interoperable suite of protocols available," said Ralph Droms, a distinguished engineer for Cisco and among those who want to form the IETF working group.

Such a group, should it be approved by the IETF, would specify how IPv6 could be deployed in the home in an easy and consistent manner, using protocols developed by the IETF.

Commercial network providers and large organizations are beginning to look at how to use IPv6, which is the successor to today's chief communications protocol for the Internet, Internet Protocol version 4. Not much work has been done to address the issue of getting homes to use IPv6, however.

Home networking is a fairly new area for the IETF. Many of its standards were designed for large-scale organizational networks, rather than home use.

"Home networking grew on-demand, by accident," Droms said. The first home consumer Internet connections often relied on a single dynamically allocated IP address assigned to the connecting computer whenever a user would dial by modem into a service provider.

As people added more computers and devices to Internet connections, they -- or their devices -- relied on NAT (Network Address Translation) as a way to set up their informal internal networks. NAT can be problematic in that it doesn't permit direct Internet access, necessitating device makers and software providers such as Skype to rig up complicated and trouble-prone work-arounds.

IPv6 will require a fundamentally different approach for setting up end nodes than is typically used today, Droms explained. Most notably, end devices will be able to access the Internet, and be accessed from the Internet, directly, rather than traversing NAT. The home Internet-facing router or cable modem will get an IPv6 prefix and each device in that home will get an Internet IPv6 address based on that prefix.

"All the devices in the home will have globally route-able addresses. I don't have to do anything to make those devices accessible to the rest of the Internet," Droms explained.

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