Yahoo, Facebook,Google to IETF: Where are the IPv6 users

By , Network World |  Networking, Yahoo, Facebook

Palmer said Microsoft's positive experience on World IPv6 Day had removed the IT department's fear of deploying IPv6. In fact, Microsoft has since enabled IPv6 on two of its websites: www.zune.net and www.marketplace.xbox.com.

"Operationally, we are confident we can deploy it quickly," Palmer said. "The biggest issue for us to take more of our sites to IPv6 is access."

Cisco was the only company to report more than 1% of its Web traffic being IPv6 on World IPv6 Day. Mark Townsley, distinguished engineer with Cisco Systems, said 1.11% of the traffic on www.cisco.com was IPv6 during the 24-hour trial period. He attributed this to the fact that Cisco's customers are "an order more magnitude interested in IPv6 than the broader population of users."

BY THE NUMBERS: Most IT pros say their websites, networks will support IPv6 by 2013

Content providers said getting 1% of all Internet traffic to be IPv6 capable will require ISPs to enable millions of homes with IPv6 access.

Gashinsky estimates that ISPs will need to deploy IPv6 to 10 customers for every one customer that will have current enough home gateways, PCs and gaming equipment to take advantage of it.

If Gashinsky's estimate is correct, ISPs would have to enable IPv6 to 200 million customers in order for 20 million of them -- or 1% of the Internet's 2 billion users -- to be IPv6 capable.

"It's going to be a long, slow transition for access networks," the IETF's Housley agreed. "At least now there is some content to see and some users who can't get IPv4 addresses. So it's a different discussion for us with the access networks since we ran out of IPv4 addresses in [the free pool] and in Asia Pacific."

Housley said that broadband providers such as Comcast, Verizon, Time Warner and Cox are making progress on their plans to deploy IPv6 to residential customers in the United States.

"Each has a significant effort in front of them, but they have deployment plans," Housley said. "A year from now, they should all be past their pilots and executing on their rollouts. Globally, we might be past the 1% mark a year from now, but the U.S. will be lagging behind."

Lorenzo Colitti, a network engineer with Google, explained the role that individual ISPs such as the French ISP Free, which started deploying IPv6 in 2007, and the Japanese ISP KDDI, a recent convert to IPv6, play in driving IPv6 traffic.

"IPv6 adoption is pretty flat. It's 0.3%," Colitti said. "The bulk of IPv6 adoption is in two networks in France and Japan. ... KDDI gave IPv6 to 15% of their users in five weeks, just in time for World IPv6 Day. One ISP, by itself, made a significant difference in the adoption of IPv6 in Japan."


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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