Adobe drops mobile Flash plugin development for HTML5 focus

By , ITworld |  Networking, Adobe, Adobe Flash

Flash in the sand

flickr/kiewic

Maybe Steve Jobs was right after all, or maybe HTML5 is maturing. Either way, Adobe announced the end of development support for their Flash Player plug-in used in mobile browsers.

A bit of a ego droop for Adobe, who shrilly announced Flash should, and would, be absolutely everywhere. But sluggish mobile performance, along with the heavy performance load that chewed through mobile batteries, finally made Adobe pull the Flash plug-in.

Adobe also announced 750 job cuts tied not to the Flash plug-in program but "corporate restructuring." Adobe will focus development on HTML5 technologies while keeping up bug fixes and security updates for their Android and Blackberry platform mobile Flash customers.

Happy

Flash - good riddance!
Gitfinger on guardian.co.uk

Interesting. Adobe can get rid of all the hacks it was probably adding to deal with mobile browsers and focus on mobile Air.
andycd on wired.com

R.I.P.

Adobe said they'd abandon flash over Steve's dead... oh...
JayS on wired.com

Apple 1 - 0 Adobe. Now maybe they will consider abandoning it on laptops, desktops, etc
completemonsterbob on guardian.co.uk

They say this but I am using a HP Touchpad with WebOS and Flash and it works brilliant and I have miniscule to none in decrease of the battery with flash enabled,
Richard Head on wired.com

Well, there goes Flash. If you have to use HTML 5 for mobile, you might as well use it for desktop as well.
CobraA1 on zdnet.com

Not so fast

Apple don't like Flash cause it would circumvent the App Store. Simple as that.
anthony davis on wired.com

They have Adobe Edge now. It should prove better for mobile devices. I'm glad I can use both though.
rossmholden on guardian.co.uk

What's also interesting is that none of you reporters and blogger really GET what this means. This means the end of commercial and entertainments sites and push towards pay-app-store model for native apps.
Boz Bundalo on wired.com

The problem is the content that's made, not Flash itself. If you try and do the same thing in HTML5 it will kill the browser / battery / device just as much, or more!
tarwin on zdnet.com

Steve Jobs, somewhere, is saying, "I told you so."

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