Avaya beefs up switch architecture to compete with Cisco, HP, others

By , Network World |  Networking, Avaya

Avaya this week rolled out extensions to its 4000 series switches and said its year-old virtualized networking architecture is taking hold in campuses and data centers.

The new Ethernet Routing Switch (ERS) 4000 series switches are designed to help enterprises optimize networks for collaboration, and simplify the convergence of voice, video and data. One of the key new features of the line is a boost in stacking bandwidth from 320G to 384Gbps.

Along with the switches, Avaya rolled out new software that includes support for Power over Ethernet (PoE) and PoE+, among other features.

The switches are compatible with Avaya's Virtual Enterprise Network Architecture (VENA), a blueprint unveiled a year ago to allow users to optimize the network for business applications and services through virtualization. VENA is a software enhancement that supports the emerging IEEE 802.1AQ Shortest Path Bridging (SPB) standard for deploying multiple active paths in a data center switch fabric

While SPB may not be going gangbusters, Avaya says components of VENA - such as switch clustering, "enhanced" Shortest Path Bridging, wireless networking, network access control, and network management - are being picked up by customers.

"Our long-term strategy is successful, and momentum continues to build up" for the architecture, says Jean Turgeon, global general manager for Avaya Networking. "Many customers have bought (Avaya switches) based on VENA. Customers like where we're going and we have real deployments."

Despite these claims, VENA and the rest of the fabric architectures out there need some showcase accounts that show quantifiable value or operational shift, says Zeus Kerravala, principal of ZK Research.

"Proof points: that's the case for much of the industry right now," Kerravala says. "How many actual customer deployments can any of them point to? It's all theory right now."


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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