Expert to IT pros: Adopt IPv6 soon or be sorry later

By , Network World |  Networking, IPv6

Some major U.S. ISPs like Verizon are conspicuously absent from the list of ISPs participating in this event. Does that mean they are behind in IPv6 deployment?

No, I wouldn't read it that way at all. Really, the way to read the list of participants is that it is a group of ISPs and content providers that were willing to step up and make the statement today. We're very much looking forward to additional service providers and content providers joining up in coming weeks.

On the Web content side, some of the participating sites like Google are already supporting IPv6 at secondary sites but not on their main Web addresses. How significant of an effort will it be for them to turn IPv6 on for this event?

In any content provider company, the goal is to serve content reliably and effectively to as many users as possible. When they bring any update to their front door, they are committed to support it commercially, 24/7, for all of their customers. They don't want to play with experimental lab projects. So turning it on at the front door is signaling that IPv6 as a commercial service is ready to go forward.

What's been going on behind the scenes at websites like Google and Yahoo over the last six months since they participated in ISOC's World IPv6 Day to prepare them for World IPv6 Launch?

I think a lot of what needed to happen for them to turn on IPv6 on their main websites happened on June 8 last year. It was clear then that it was feasible to run IPv6 in a commercial way. A lot of the activity since then has been focused on making sure it was introduced into the regular operational streams for all parts of their front doors. Although there were a lot of sites that came on last June and stayed on last June.

Why is it important for the Internet engineering community to have home gateway vendors like Cisco and D-Link participate in this event?

It's a critical piece in making sure that if an ISP provides IPv6 access, that their users can use it. There has been a lot of inherent IPv6 capability in the global Internet that hasn't been tapped into because of missing links between ISPs and home users. The CPE piece is absolutely critical.

What will ISOC be doing between now and June 6 to attract other participants to this event?

We are going to make sure that as many different service providers, content providers and CPE vendors are aware of it and can signal their interest in participating in it. ISOC has five regional bureaus around the globe, so we will be reaching out to more regional providers. We're working with our 100-plus chapters and individual members to foster various events around the globe related to IPv6.

What should enterprise network operators be taking away from the announcement of this event in terms of their own IPv6 deployments?


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

NetworkingWhite Papers & Webcasts

See more White Papers | Webcasts

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question