Samsung's Galaxy Tab 2: Five things to know

By , Network World |  Networking, Android, Samsung Galaxy Tab

Samsung's sequel to the Galaxy Tab will make its public debut next month and you may be wondering what separates it from all the other Android tablets on the market.

We've gone through all the specifications and features to discern both what the new Galaxy Tab model offers users as well as what it lacks compared to the competition. Here are five things you should know about Samsung's Galaxy Tab 2:

First: It runs on Android 4.0 ("Ice Cream Sandwich"). This is important because Ice Cream Sandwich is the first edition of Google's open-source Android mobile platform that has been optimized for both tablets and smartphones. Google developed the platform to unite Android on both form factors and thus give application developers assurance that they can develop applications for Android that will perform consistently over different types of devices.

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In addition, the operating system came with several new features including a lock screen that can unlock using facial recognition software; Android Beam, technology that lets users send contact information, directions, Web pages and more via NFC by tapping their phones together; and integration with the Google+ social network that lets users host online video chats among their circles of friends.

Second: It will give users the ability to surf the Web with Google Chrome. Last week Google announced that it was slowly rolling out its mobile version of its popular Chrome browser to tablets and smartphones running on Ice Cream Sandwich. Since the Galaxy Tab 2 does indeed run on Ice Cream Sandwich you'll thus be able to browse the Web on Chrome instead of on Google's standard Android default browser.

With the release of Chrome for Android, Google is promising users that they'll soon be able to experience the same quality of browsing on their smartphones and tablets that they experience on their desktop computers. If your Android device is signed into your Google account, your Android Chrome browser will automatically open up with the tabs that you have open on your desktop. The mobile version of Chrome will also sync up bookmarks on your current browser and give autocomplete suggestions based on frequently visited websites.


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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