At least 1 woman should be interviewed for every IT job opening, advocacy group says

By , Network World |  IT Management, women in IT

The report also notes, "The training and salary of Choice employees has been assumed by the corporate budget, not individual managers, offering additional incentives for managers to attract Choice candidates." The program is said to be bringing in 500 interns and full-time hires per year in the years since 2006 to 2011, and Cisco engineering has seen a "10% increase in the representation of technical female college recruits since its inception" while retention rates are also up about 30%.

Anita Borg Institute will be holding its annual "Women of Vision" awards banquet in May at the Santa Clara Convention Center in California, where the group will honor individuals and companies for fostering women's participation in the IT workplace.

The winner for the 2012 Anita Borg Top Company for Technical Women award is American Express. Not only did the company recruit, train and retain women in technology positions, including at the executive level, at 30%, but American Express has "best practices" that include "a highly flexible work schedule; the creation of a vibrant women's community; a strong sponsorship program and a focus on creating awareness of gender intelligence among the workforce overall."

Paul Dottle, senior vice president and CTO at American Express commented, "This award reflects our culture of inclusiveness and the programs we have in place to ensure that our people have the flexibility and support to balance their professional and personal lives, and build long and successful careers at American Express."

Anita Borg Institute is also honoring three women selected for technical excellence, specifically Jennifer Chayes, distinguished scientist and managing director of Microsoft Research New England for her work uniting theoretical computer science with computational biology; Sarita V. Adve, a professor in the department of computer science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign for her contributions to hardware and software memory models; and S. Revi Sterling, director of ICTD graduate programs at the University of Colorado at Boulder, for having a social impact in the lives of women through development of a new participatory community radio technology that's especially of use in less-developed parts of the world.

Ellen Messmer is senior editor at Network World, an IDG publication and website, where she covers news and technology trends related to information security.

Read more about infrastructure management in Network World's Infrastructure Management section.


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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