D-Link DIR-605L Cloud Router review: Strong monitoring capabilities but indifferent performance

This router lets you monitor and control some network functions from an Internet-connected iOS or Android device.

By Yardena Arar, PC World |  Networking, D-Link, routers

In my tests, I ran into two difficulties: First, the date and time stamps on the Web-browsing history were off, indicating that the activity had occurred in November 2011. D-Link told me that this happened because the router's internal clock hadn't been adjusted during setup, but I couldn't remember being advised to set the router clock at that time. Once I made the adjustment (by going into the advanced manual setup interface), the date and time discrepancies disappeared (though only for browsing that took place after I changed the router's internal clock).

The other problem was that the Mydlink app didn't always show all of the devices that I knew were connected. At first, only a couple of devices appeared on the list. But a few days after I set up the router, more devices began to show up. D-Link officials say that they are looking into this anomaly.

Asked whether having the ability to access network information might also expose a user's devices to intruders, D-Link officials pointed out that all of the information comes from the router itself: It doesn't log in to your machines to collect browsing information, for example.

Overall, I would recommend the DIR-605L to people who are willing to sacrifice some performance for the ability to monitor network activity from afar. The router's lack of 5GHz support, in particular, is disappointing for city dwellers, who often knock each other off the narrow 2.4GHz band that the Cloud Router supports, and the 2x2 antenna array supports theoretical top speeds of only 300 mbps (new routers with a larger number of antennas are rated at up to 600 mbps). Also, some business users who want a fast wired network for backups or large file transfers will be put off by the lack of gigabit ethernet support.

That said, the DIR-605L is probably speedy enough for most general tasks that don't involve a lot of streaming media, and its remote access features will likely appeal to certain small-business owners, parents, and others who want to keep tabs on network activity. The relatively low price should clinch the deal.


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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