6 ways to use multiple displays with your laptop

By Paul Mah, CIO |  Networking, displays

The advantage of this technique for using multiple displays is that it taps into the inherent graphics processing power of the graphics processing unit (GPU), which means that the visual experience ends up being the most seamless of the multiple display options. Beyond getting the graphics driver to work properly with the GXM, there is no need to modify the operating system or employ any form of low-level hacks. One downside is that using the GXM does mean that additional displays are effectively stuck in a landscape configuration and cannot be switched into portrait mode.

Strictly speaking, the company's GXM appliance works with both laptops and desktops, though it is of greater benefit to laptop users. Obviously, the GXM will work only with a graphics card of sufficient oomph, and the company has developed a compatibility tool to figure out the maximum number of displays and resolution that can be supported on a particular rig. The latest GXM devices released by Matrox are the aforementioned DualHead2Go and TripleHead2Go, both of which accept DisplayPort as input and will work with both PC and Mac laptops.

4. Dedicated DisplayLink Adapter

The DisplayLink technology mentioned earlier can also be implemented for a laptop-based workstation, where up to six displays are supported per system using specialized DisplayLink adapters. Since the DisplayLink technology consumes a fraction of the processing cycles from its host, one drawback is that it may perform poorer in underpowered systems or when multiple large displays are used, as opposed to solutions that uses dedicated display adapters.

High-definition displays of up to 2560x1440 are not supported by any DisplayLink adapters currently on the market, though that should soon change given that the latest DisplayLink DL-3000 chip platform is capable of supporting displays of up to 2560x1600. For now, vendors such as Targus have also released high-performance docking stations built around USB 3.0 and incorporating DisplayLink technology to support up to two displays.

5. External GPU


Originally published on CIO |  Click here to read the original story.
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