iPhone 5 rumor rollup for the week ending June 8

By , Network World |  Networking, iPhone, iPhone 5

Steipp "confirmed his company's involvement by announcing it is supplying Liquidmetal to Apple," reveals 9to5's Jake Smith, as though this was genuine news. He quotes Steipp from the video: "Our technology has been commercialized in a number of accounts, most recently by Apple computer ..." It may be that Steip is referring to some new part that will be appearing in future iPhone, but he could simply be referring to the SIM extractor tool.

At iPhone 5 News Blog, Nace sees the video as a deliberate campaign by Liquidmetal: "LiquidMetal Revitalizes iPhone 5 Form Factor Rumors Ahead Of WWDC" is his headline. "With less than a week to go before the kick-off of the Worldwide Developers Conference, LiquidMetal is injecting themselves back into Apple and iPhone 5 speculation," he writes, adding later, "The timing of this video cannot be overlooked ..."

"Now, with the WWDC less than a week away, LiquidMetal is once again making news, inciting the speculators to once wonder: is LiquidMetal going to show up at the WWDC?"

But a recent story at the stock market opinion site Seeking Alpha suggests that publicly traded Liquidmetal has been playing this card repeatedly, to spur both sales and its stock price, with rumor sites as willing accomplices.

Jason Kuepper notes that the company "has experienced a sharp run-up after rumors surfaced that Apple Inc. would include the technology in the iPhone 5 and future products. But what does that contract mean for Liquidmetal and its shareholders?"

The short answer is: It means whatever Liquidmetal can convince shareholders to believe or hope for. "Liquidmetal's recent run-up in share price may not be fully justified on the surface by rumors that Apple would include the technology in the new iPhone 5," Kuepper says, with masterful understatement. "After all, the $20 million [license] payment was already recorded and gave Apple exclusive rights to the technology, even in the overall consumer electronics industry." And as Kuepper notes, that $20 million is the "only financial upside" to result from the Apple deal.

"Despite this seeming downside, the license deal does provide the company with a great endorsement from one of the world's largest companies," Kuepper writes. "It also increases the company's brand recognition, thanks to the fact that the technology is named after the company. And, this could lead to additional sales by turning the product into a 'household name.'"

No kidding. Just Google "liquidmetal" and "apple."


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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