Best BYOD management: Containment is your friend

Emerging containerization technologies create a separate, protected workspace on employees' personal smartphones.

By , Computerworld |  Consumerization of IT, BYOD

Directory integration is another area where tools are still evolving. "We'd like to see more integration with Active Directory and with PeopleSoft or whatever the source of record is to control user profiles," Terry says. "Ideally, tighter integration that would disable access automatically or restrict access to published applications based on a user's role." Today businesses may need to turn to integrators such as Vox Mobile to provide that level of integration.

Containerization is also limited in terms of troubleshooting and general support issues if the enterprise doesn't have visibility into the performance of the total device, argues Steve Chong, manager of messaging and collaboration at Union Bank, which uses Good for Enterprise. Is the problem related to signal strength? Has the user run out of storage space? Is there a way for IT to remotely access the phone to diagnose issues?

"We need all of that without having to have multiple agents installed on the phone," he says, because each agent adds complexity and uses up resources.

"Having agents on the phone means that it needs to be constantly on all the time for data gathering, but that means that it will consume phone resources," Chong says. Also, it's "software that now needs to be managed and updated on users' phones."

Today many businesses, if they have a BYOD program at all, either aren't using MDM or are using a very basic tool such as Microsoft's Exchange ActiveSync, which allows mobile access to the user's Exchange email and calendar. "The next phase is getting to MDM. Then [IT staffers] can look at application security and management," Redman says.

Containerization is limited in terms of troubleshooting and general support issues if the enterprise doesn't have visibility into the performance of the total device, argues Steve Chong, manager of messaging and collaboration at Union Bank.

At West Virginia University, the cost of tools outweighs the risks -- at least for now. Yohn says the school uses only ActiveSync to support its 4,500 faculty and staff. He'd like to do more, but says licensing costs for the containerization tools he researched would have exceeded $100,000 annually. "We'll wait until prices fall, or something happens and we determine that we need to make this investment," he says.

At CareerBuilder, a jobs website and staffing firm, individuals who want to use their own phones can connect by way of ActiveSync, but downloaded data is not encrypted unless the user chooses to do so at the device level. Further, IT doesn't offer any support for users connecting with their own smartphones.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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