Best BYOD management: Containment is your friend

Emerging containerization technologies create a separate, protected workspace on employees' personal smartphones.

By , Computerworld |  Consumerization of IT, BYOD

Users can also install, on their own, apps to access SaaS applications such as Concur and Salesforce.com. "We defaulted to that," says senior vice president of information technology Roger Fugett. But with nearly half of CareerBuilder's 2,600 employees now bringing their own devices, Fugett says he's taking a hard look at the potential risks and how to mitigate those. Containerization and general MDM tools are on his radar.

The coming consolidation

Containerization is rapidly becoming a necessity for supporting BYOD, and the technology is evolving rapidly, says Stephen Singh, director for infrastructure practice at professional services firm PwC. "It works relatively efficiently and meets the regulatory compliance needs for many of the customers we speak with."

In most shops, containerization is -- or should be -- one part of an overall MDM strategy. Going forward it should be possible, for example, to apply one set of policies to the entire device, another to a protected container where app stores deposit applications, and a third to specific corporate apps, with variations depending on the user's role or group.

Indeed, Symantec says its Odyssey MDM tool can be used to enforce a device-level password while Nukona applies application-specific controls.

Containerization is already starting to be absorbed into the major MDM platforms. Symantec plans to merge into its Nukona containerization and Odyssey MDM acquisitions into its Altiris offering for managing servers, desktops and laptops; and Mobile Iron now offers its own APIs for application integration. "In the next six months we'll see more application security and management integrated into MDM systems," says Redman.

Eventually, he says, MDM will broaden into a "systems management platform for the enterprise" that includes security, content management, application management and application development, and it will extend to laptops and desktops as well as tablets and smartphones.

That's high on the wish list at Union Bank, which relies on two different consoles to manage BlackBerry and other mobile devices. "I want a universal dashboard. There's no technology that does that today," Chong says.

BNY Mellon has already started down that road. "We chose MaaS360 because we can run it across our full mobility network, whether a laptop, phone or tablet," Perkins says. "I can provision access to all of those devices at once, knowing that each has a different graphical paradigm. That's the way we think people will be moving."


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Consumerization of ITWhite Papers & Webcasts

See more White Papers | Webcasts

Answers - Powered by ITworld

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question
randomness