iPhone 5: Why no NFC?

Slow adoption of NFC in U.S. means Apple was wise to wait, some experts say

By , Computerworld |  Mobile & Wireless, Apple, iPhone

Apple left out near-field communication technology in the new iPhone 5, a decision that one NFC backer said could result in Apple's loss.

But several mobile payment experts said Apple probably made a good choice for now, given the slow rollout of NFC, especially in the U.S.

Only 2% of merchants globally are equipped with NFC-reader terminals, not nearly enough to merit Apple's attention, said Rick Oglesby, an analyst at Aite Group. "Apple would need something really global to make it work," he said.

Apple's critics included a UK-based communications marketing company called Proxama. "NFC is going to progress at a pace without Apple," said Miles Quitmann, managing director of Proxama, in a statement. "This could be Apple's loss."

Quitmann said many credit card companies and smartphone vendors have committed to NFC, spending millions of dollars on developing the technology. Proxama is working with Device Fidelity on an NFC battery sleeve that will allow an iPhone 5 to interact with NFC marketing tags embedded in posters and product packaging.

What Apple decided to do instead of NFC is promote its Passbook mobile payment software, which runs on the new iPhone's iOS 6 mobile operating system.

Passbook relies on transmitting payment data via barcodes on the iPhone 5's 4-in. display, according to a video of Apple's iPhone launch at around the 45 minutes mark.

"Passbook is the best way to collect all your passes in one place," said Scott Forstall, senior vice president of iOS software. He showed how an airline boarding pass, a Starbucks card, a football ticket and other forms of money-backed "passes" can be presented in barcode format to make a transaction.

Starbucks has been successfully using a similar barcode scanning concept with its Starbucks card for more than a year, since it already had the optical barcode scanners installed at pay stations in its stores. Starbucks officials said they didn't want to wait for NFC chips to be widely deployed in smartphones.

NFC requires special software or a special payment terminal for communicating with the NFC chip in a smartphone, and some merchants have balked at making those changes.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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