How to prepare for Google algorithm changes

By Jim Martin, CIO |  Networking, Google, search engine optimization

Google's goal: With Penguin, Google is cracking down on a common black hat SEO practice: abusing links to gain search engine rankings. If you paid for links from lots of dubious, low-quality link directories, link exchanges and other sites, you may have felt the Penguin slap.

What you should do: Penguin has already been updated twice and is likely to updated again soon, Meyers says. As a result, it's more important than ever to have link quality and diversity. Earn "natural" links from a variety of other quality sites because you've posted compelling, useful content.

News: Google Begins Penalizing Search "Over-Optimization"News: Copyright Removal Requests to Affect Google Search Ranking

Don't focus on getting links from other sites using identical anchor text. "Look at where your links are coming from using Google Webmaster tools and what the anchor text links are," says Ting-Yu Liu, Covario's manager of paid media services. "Try to have at least 60% keyword diversification. If you have 80% of external sites linking to you with the same anchor text, that's a problem."

Google Knowledge Graph: Find Information Without Visiting Any Sites

What it is: In May 2012, Google launched an upgrade to the Knowledge Graph, its database of more than 500 million people, places and things. Search for Tom Hanks, for example, and you should see to the right of the search results information about Hanks-a photo, who he is, when he was born, his spouse and children and so on. This information is pulled from various sources, such as Wikipedia, which Google uses for its Knowledge Graph.

Google's goal: To immediately serve users the information they might be looking for without requiring them to click to any sites to find it.

What you should do: If you post recipes, movie showtimes, event listings or other structured data on your site, make sure you meet Google's guidelines for such data. The website Schema.org is a great place to learn more about structured data and where Google may be heading with its Knowledge Graph-which Meyers thinks will only become more important in the future.

The 7 Results Update: Google Decides Less is More


Originally published on CIO |  Click here to read the original story.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question