Mobile remote control may be the ticket for home automation

Being able to control automated appliances and sensors via smartphones and tablets is proving a technology driver

By , IDG News Service |  Networking

Home automation is finally moving forward under the power of smartphones and tablets, judging from developments coming to light this week around International CES.

Products for monitoring and controlling systems in homes have been on the market for several years, but mobile apps to control those products have expanded their uses and given the technology a cool factor it once lacked.

Widely available fast networks, both wired and wireless, are helping to make the so-called "Internet of things" viable, according to Endpoint Technologies Associates analyst Roger Kay. The concept refers to networking between all sorts of objects that communicate on their own, including industrial gear and "smart meters," but also appliances, cameras and sensors in homes. "I feel it's getting more real every year," Kay said.

On Monday, Cisco Systems announced a home automation platform that ties together lighting, heating, home alarm systems, door locks and other elements under the control of a wireless-based system that can be managed via smartphones, tablets and PCs. It will form the basis of a service from AT&T that will come to eight U.S. markets in March and 50 more over the rest of the year, the companies said.

Within each home, the AT&T Digital Life service will run on a central Cisco-built controller, which will have five types of radios, including Wi-Fi, Zigbee and Z-Wave, to talk with different types of connected devices. The controller will also be able to link to devices via existing electrical wiring with the HomePlug AV networking protocol. Cisco will make available a software framework for development of additional services over time.

Some exhibitors at a curtain-raising event for CES on Sunday night showed off other home products and services that tie in to control via mobile devices.

Alarm.com, which sells a service for remote control of home security systems, showed how consumers can access the service through smartphone and tablet apps to do things like arm and disarm home alarm systems. The service costs about US$45 to $55 per month and is sold through home security system dealers. It can run over several 3G mobile services in North America, including AT&T, T-Mobile and Verizon Wireless. The monthly fee covers the cost of data used for the security service, said Jay Kenny, vice president of marketing at Alarm.com

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