OpenDaylight is building on our work, SDN group's director says

The Open Networking Foundation intended its OpenFlow protocol to be built upon, its executive director said

By , IDG News Service |  Networking

The OpenDaylight Project may have won attention last week with a founding list of vendors including Cisco Systems and Juniper Networks, but it's standing on the shoulders of others, according to the head of the Open Networking Foundation.

OpenDaylight will be building part of its planned framework for software-defined networking on the OpenFlow protocol that ONF introduced in 2011, ONF Executive Director Dan Pitt said on Tuesday at the Open Networking Summit. The standing-room-only conference is ONF's annual gathering to discuss SDN (software-defined networking), which is intended to place the control of networks in software apart from dedicated hardware.

"It's sort of an evolution of what we were doing," Pitt said in answer to an audience member's question at the conference in Santa Clara, California. "I don't think you would be able to start this ... OpenDaylight consortium if you didn't have a foundation to build upon."

Specifically, OpenDaylight's planned API (application programming interface) for communication between its controller software and network devices will be built on OpenFlow, Pitt said. That's despite the fact that ONF is not a member of OpenDaylight, which includes a long list of major IT and networking vendors including IBM, Hewlett-Packard, Microsoft and Ericsson.

Despite broad agreement on SDN's potential, building a whole new foundation for networking is proving to be a complicated dance among vendors, academic projects and standards bodies.

OpenDaylight plans to develop an entire open-source framework for SDN, of which the so-called "southbound API" between controller and network devices would be just one part. The project is being hosted by the Linux Foundation, and the consortium says it is committed to openness, with membership open to any individual or company. OpenDaylight said it had had discussions with ONF.

Last week, ONF, which includes Google, Facebook, Verizon and Deutsche Telekom among its members, responded cautiously to OpenDaylight's launch.

"As a voice of the user community, ONF supports those initiatives that are true to our guiding principles by being based on multi-vendor standards and open to broad, merit-based, multi-vendor input. We are eager to see how this and other initiatives measure up to these principles and meet the needs of users," the group said in a statement.

At least one prominent member of ONF, open software-based networking vendor Big Switch Networks, told Network World it was concerned about Cisco's influence on OpenDaylight.

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