With LTE, AT&T isn't done evolving its network yet

AT&T looks to LTE Broadcast and virtualization to deal with data growth and come out with new services

By , IDG News Service |  Networking

Several network initiatives that AT&T is unveiling this week show the carrier is far from finished advancing its network even as it achieves a broad footprint with LTE.

The company plans to roll out LTE Broadcast technology over the next three years to help it deliver specialized content in specific locations, among other things, Chairman and CEO Randall Stephenson told a Goldman Sachs financial conference on Tuesday morning. In the same session, he laid out AT&T's goal to convert its whole infrastructure into a system based on LTE, IP (Internet Protocol) and cloud computing, replacing traditional copper phone lines by 2020.

On Monday, AT&T signaled a commitment to SDN (software-defined networking) and NFV (network functions virtualization), including seeking out some technology vendors with new ideas. And in a nod to the potential of unlicensed Wi-Fi networks, on Tuesday it announced a partnership with Fon to expand international Wi-Fi roaming.

LTE officially stands for Long-Term Evolution, and the global standard is itself evolving into upcoming versions that will allow for features such as combining separate frequency bands into one. But AT&T, like other carriers, is also continuing to find ways to make its network more efficient and better able to handle mobile data demand that Stephenson said is rising by about 50 percent every year.

One way AT&T hopes to meet that demand is with LTE Broadcast, which is designed to send specific kinds of content at certain times and places, such as sports venues. This can ease the burden on a carrier's general wide-area mobile network, reducing congestion and boosting subscribers' speeds.

AT&T's plan for LTE Broadcast is a kind of homecoming for the technology, which has its roots in Qualcomm's defunct FLO TV. After the FLO TV video service that Qualcomm delivered failed to catch on, AT&T acquired the spectrum over which it ran. The carrier now plans to use those frequencies for LTE Broadcast.

The spectrum buy gave AT&T 12MHz of frequencies in the most populous areas of the U.S. near the coasts and 6MHz toward the middle of the country, Stephenson said. It will use that spectrum to deliver video and other content in settings where most people are interested in seeing the same things, he said.

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