In a room with no cell service, Verizon works on the future of mobile

A radio-shielded lab is part of an expanded S.F. Innovation Center for helping startups

By , IDG News Service |  Networking

If you think your house has bad cellular coverage, Verizon Wireless has you beat: A small, windowless room high up in a San Francisco office building gets no service at all.

That's not because carriers are neglecting the bustling South of Market business district where the room is located. Instead, it's because Verizon is paying so much attention to what's going on there.

The room with zero bars is in the heart of the Verizon Innovation Center, where Verizon network and business experts help developers of new wireless devices and apps to turn their ideas into products. The center opened there about two years ago, setting up shop in a hotbed of startup activity in the tech-heavy Bay Area.

Now Verizon has expanded the center, and at a media event on Tuesday it showed off the facility and some examples of technologies that have been in the incubation process: a chest patch that reads vital signs and transmits them wirelessly, a gateway for wireless automated homes, and a bike lock that uses GPS (Global Positioning System). At this center and another like it near Boston, Verizon tries to help startups get these kinds of technologies from lab to market in six to eight weeks, according to Gagan Puranik, associate director of Verizon's innovation centers.

There are plenty of places to turn in the Bay Area for help in getting a startup off the ground and selling products, including a herd of venture capitalists and scores of established tech companies seeking partnerships or acquisitions. Verizon has its own value proposition for innovators that includes resources such as that radio-shielded room.

As the country's biggest mobile operator and a global telecommunications juggernaut, Verizon can offer the help of its radio-frequency engineers, expertise on cloud computing, security, telematics and other areas, and insights into the user experience, Puranik said. The company can also open up its network APIs (application programming interfaces) and offer the assistance of an application development team based in nearby Palo Alto.

The shielded room, about the size of a walk-in closet, only has space for a small desk, a couple of chairs and a bank of network equipment. It isn't meant to stay wireless-free. Instead, Verizon engineers use current and emerging wireless gear to create special radio environments for testing.

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