How load balancing is playing a bigger role in tech transitions

By John Moore, CIO |  Networking, load balancing

At one point, W&W|AFCO Steel was running SQL Server 2005 and 2008 and planning to migrate to SQL 2012. But an outage affected a significant portion of the company's IT infrastructure before that transition could occur: The Citrix environment on SQL Server 2005 went down for three days, says Todd Park, vice president of IT at W&W|AFCO Steel.

A the time, the steel fabricator lacked a high availability capability. But after its brush with failure, the company deployed DH2i's DxConsole server application virtualization software. DxConsole includes a resource manager that load balances virtual instances, providing a failover capability.

W&W|AFCO Steel put DxConsole into production earlier this year. The company's SQL Server 2008 R2 and SQL Server 2012 virtual instances failover to one another in the event of an outage, Park explains.

The software requires little intervention to operate, which is a boon for a company with a small IT shop, Park says. "We don't need to manage anything on a daily basis. It just works."

John Moore has written on business and technology topics for more than 20 years. His areas of focus include mobile app development, health IT, cloud computing, government IT and distribution channels. Follow everything from CIO.com on Twitter @CIOonline, Facebook, Google + and LinkedIn.

Read more about event-driven architecture in CIO's Event-driven architecture Drilldown.


Originally published on CIO |  Click here to read the original story.
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