Attackers use NTP reflection in huge DDoS attack

The attack peaked at over 400Gbps according to CloudFlare, the company whose infrastructure was targeted

By Lucian Constantin, IDG News Service |  Networking

Attackers abused insecure Network Time Protocol servers to launch what appears to be one of the largest DDoS (distributed denial-of-service) attacks ever, this time against the infrastructure of CloudFlare, a company that operates a global content delivery network.

The attack was revealed Monday on Twitter by Matthew Prince, CloudFlare's CEO, who said that it's "the start of ugly things to come" because "someone's got a big, new cannon."

The size of the attack appears to have been just shy of 400Gbps, ranking it among the largest DDoS attacks CloudFlare has seen, Prince said Tuesday via email, adding that the company is still gathering data about the incident from upstream providers.

The attack could be larger than the one last March against Spamhaus, a spam-fighting organization and CloudFlare customer whose website was hit by a 300Gbps DDoS attack, which was considered to be the largest in history at the time. CloudFlare reported then that it caused congestion at critical Internet exchange nodes in Europe. However, other companies later challenged the reported impact.

The new attack Monday used a technique called NTP reflection that involves sending requests with spoofed source IP addresses to NTP servers with the intention of forcing those servers to return large responses to the spoofed addresses instead of the real senders.

The attack was directed at a CloudFlare user, Prince said, but he declined to disclose any additional details about the customer citing the company's policy.

The DDoS traffic hit CloudFlare's data centers worldwide, but only caused temporary congestion on the company's network in Europe, he said.

There is also some anecdotal evidence that there were congestion issues in other parts of the Internet infrastructure that are not directly related to CloudFlare, but nothing definitive, he said. "The most likely place that slowness would have been observed is across European peering exchanges. However, our team moved quickly to take traffic off exchanges in order to minimize collateral damage."

Shortly after Prince revealed the attack on Twitter, Octave Klaba, the founder and CEO of large French hosting provider OVH, reported that his company's network had also been hit for hours Monday with a DDoS attack that far exceeded 350Gbps.

It's not clear if the attack against OVH also used NTP reflection or if it's related to the attack against CloudFlare.

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