NYSE to implement 100Gbps network

By , Network World |  Networking, Ciena, NYSE

NYSE Euronext, the company that operates the New York Stock Exchange, will soon implement a 100Gbps data network with help from network equipment vendor Ciena. 

Ciena says the 100G network will serve as the cornerstone of NYSE Euronext's new data centers in the New York and London metropolitan areas, which are due to come online in 2010. According to Ciena, the data centers will need the bandwidth capacity to support "more than one billion daily transactions comprising petabytes of data."

The network will utilize Ciena's CN 4200 RS FlexSelect Advanced Services Platform, a wavelength-division multiplexing transport platform that the company says is "designed for telco and cable service providers, large enterprises, research and education institutions, and government organizations to deploy in locations that require massive service aggregation and wavelength routing."

Ciena first gave a live demonstration of its 100G network capabilities at the Supercomputing Conference 2008 back in December. The company says that its own technology is able to generate 100Gbps over a single wavelength, unlike other 100G tests in the past that have combined two 40Gbps wavelengths or have inversely multiplexed ten 10Gbps wavelengths.

The NYSE Euronext 100G network might not be the only 100G network to come online next year. Verizon Business is still working on its plan to upgrade its major routes in the United States to 100Gbps. Although the company last year had hoped to start deploying 100Gbps technology within the United States in 2009, Verizon now says that it will spend most of this year testing out its capabilities with the goal of deploying the technology in 2010.

Verizon first tested its 100G capabilities in 2007 when it transmitted a live video feed over 312 miles from Tampa to Miami. Joseph Cook, Verizon Business' vice president for global network engineering, says the 100G test "showed us that we could deploy 100G on routes and not disrupt current wavelengths."

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