10 Gigabit upgrade helps college modernize network

By , Network World |  Networking, Ethernet, Extreme Networks

For the upgrade, Bowen stuck with Extreme because a big-name vendor like Cisco probably would have been two-thirds more expensive, he says. Another important factor for the College of New Jersey was Extreme's Ethernet Automatic Protection Switching (EAPS) technology, which provides rapid recovery after link and node failures.

Adoption of 10 Gigabit Ethernet is increasing rapidly, with worldwide vendor revenue jumping from $384 million in 2004 to $1.2 billion in 2006 and up to $2.5 billion in 2008, according to Dell'Oro research. A standard for 40 and 100 Gigabit Ethernet is being considered by IEEE, and is on track for approval in June 2010. Products should hit the market by the second half of 2010, according to Extreme Networks.

Customers are still buying more 1 Gigabit products than 10 Gigabit, but revenue for 10 Gig should more than double by 2013, says Huy Nguyen, director of convergence technologies for Extreme Networks. Today, 10 Gigabit Ethernet is becoming pervasive in the core network, whereas Gigabit Ethernet is still ruling the edge, according to the vendor.

"One of the factors for 10 Gigabit migration is cost," Nguyen says. "If I want to make an investment and upgrade the network today, I want to make sure that investment will last for five to seven years."

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