Making Oracle Applications Easier

By Amy Helen Johnson, ITworld |  Opinion

Abrams
says she doesn't see consultants -- or for that matter, Oracle itself,
a natural choice to enter the market -- becoming competitors.

Greenbaum agrees, adding that consulting firms have a billable-hours
business model, not a software licensing model. He says Crystallize's
future competition is more likely to come from a company similar to
itself: an Oracle third-party partner.

The market for Crystallize's software is limited. Since it's focused
solely on particular versions of Oracle Applications, the number of
potential customers ranges from about 5,000 to 7,000, says Greenbaum.
And only those companies that have a business need -- a merger, a spin-
off or another change that makes it preferable to modify the underlying
database structures of their back-end applications -- are likely to be
interested.

But even if another firm was to tackle the same problem, Greenbaum
says, it will take the right combination of Oracle experience and start-
up talent to build the necessary products. "It was an opportunity that
existed for a long time but waited for the right entrepreneurial
outlook to take advantage of it,"he says.

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