Hallelujah! Motorola Xoom is free from Verizon bloatware

It's a mobile miracle: The Motorola Xoom is untainted by Verizon's typically unavoidable bloatware.

By , PC World |  Mobile & Wireless, Motorola Xoom, smartphones

For prospective Xoom buyers, the news just keeps getting better.

Earlier today, we heard Verizon had come to its senses and gotten rid of the ridiculous data plan requirement it had originally attached to Motorola's new Honeycomb tablet. Up till this morning, Big Red had said you'd have to sign up for at least a month of 3G service to get a Xoom, even if you only wanted to use Wi-Fi -- a catch that would've cost you an extra 55 bucks at checkout. Thankfully, that condition is history.

Now, I'm happy to confirm that another potential pitfall for the Motorola Xoom has been averted: The tablet is untainted by Verizon's typically unavoidable bloatware.

That, my friends, is a mobile miracle.

Motorola Xoom and Verizon: No Heavy Meddling

Plenty of us have been plagued by Verizon's notorious smartphone bloatware -- you know, the crap the carrier loves to load up on its phones and make difficult for us users to uninstall. Devices like the Droid X are packed with junk like Visual Voicemail (a less-good, subscription-based version of Google Voice), VZ Navigator (a less-good, subscription-based version of Google Maps), and random services like Amazon MP3 and Blockbuster that you may or may not actually want. It's a way for Verizon to make extra money, of course, but from a user perspective, it's incredibly obnoxious.

(To be fair, other carriers are guilty of this, too -- but the Xoom's a Verizon device, so we'll focus our bloatware-induced rage at them for today.)

The Motorola Xoom, amazingly, escaped the production line unscathed by the claws of Verizon's bloatware beast. The tablet does come with the standard suite of Google's Android apps, such as Gmail, Maps, Places, and Latitude. But when you're buying an Android device, you expect that; these apps are essentially part of the Android operating system, and with the exception of maybe Latitude, they're pretty damn good. Visual Voicemail? Not so much.


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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