Techdirt takedown shows how easy it is to use copyright to muzzle opponents

Competitors launch 67% of takedown requests, as SOPA supporters try for even more power to abuse

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Tech news/opinion blog Techdirt put up an interestingly ironic post yesterday morning: While using Google to search for other Techdirt stories site editor Mike Masnick realized one of the most popular in a long list of articles opposing overly restrictive copyright controls in the SOPA and PIPA bills had been removed from Google's search index following a bogus charge that it violated someone else's copyright.

The Nov. 22 post is still up on Techdirt's site, of course. It's easily findable if you type in enough of the words in its title.

If you search for it by date at Techdirt, using the Site:Techdirt.com query modifier to isolate the search to just Techdirt.com, the post doesn't appear.

The post titled "The Definitive Post On Why SOPA And Protect IP Are Bad, Bad Ideas" should be on this page, between the titles "MPAA Helped Police Seize 'Pirated' DVDs That Were Actually Fully…" and Misleading Metaphors That Drive The War on Sharing…." It isn't, though Google's search page ran this notice that two entries had been removed.

Search on the full title and the post appears along with posts and comments about it, on both Techdirt and other sites.

A Jan. 18 follow-up with a very similar title appears with no problem.

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