What would be a good video editor for small business use?

SilverHawk

We have to produce web video on a fairly regular basis and have been using the crummy (technical term) video editing software that came with the camera. None of us were in the AV Crowd in school, and we just have to make the occasional serviceable web video, we are not trying to be the next Terrence Malick. Still the free software that was included causes us to spend unnecessary time editing because it is just so clunky. We don't need a lot of bells and whistles for our purposes, so a professional editing suite would be overkill and a waste of money. What would be a good option for software that would be appropriate for our amateur cameraman/editors to use to easily produce decent video?

Topic: Software
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sandeepseeram
Vote Up (18)

Video Edit Magic 4.4 is a new release for small business use. Video Edit Magic works with AVI, WAV, WMA, WMV, ASF, MPEG, QuickTime, AIFF, AU, SND and MIDI media file formats and BMP, GIF, JPEG and TGA image file formats.
You may also increase or decrease the duration of your video clip and change its play speed without needing to change the frame-rate of your video file.

ome amazing things that you can do with this software is: Capture Videos using any input device, digital video camera, Web Cam or VCR. Edit the audio and video components of a single media file separately. Give effects to your videos. Decorate your videos with more than 150 unique transitions. Overlay one video over another. Add a background score / voiceover to your video file. Vary the volume over time. Incorporate Text titles in your videos. Change the duration of your media file. Cut copy and paste clips from one media file to another. Join multiple media clips into a single media file. Trim your videos and audios. Edit the audio and video components of a single media file separately, etc.

 

 

Sandeep Seeram

 

jack12
Vote Up (16)

You didn't mention whether you use Macs or PCs.  For Mac users the gold standard for video editing is Final Cut Pro, but it sounds like that would be overkill for what you need.  You can literally edit a feature film using Final Cut Pro, but that makes it potentially overwhelming for "casual" use.  iMovie, which is also on Macs, as I'm sure the "i" tipped you off, sounds like it could do everything you need, and it is much more simple to use than Final Cut.  I am not as familiar with editing software for PCs; even though most of our computers are PCs, I always use the Macs for video editing.

keithshaw
Vote Up (14)

Like Jack12's answer, I'd recommend iMovie as well - it comes free on new versions of Macs, but the price of a Mac is worth it in order to get the iMovie software. I'd say about 95% of your video projects can be completed with iMovie.

On the PC side it gets trickier, but we found that we could get decent videos with Adobe Premiere Elements (the smaller version of Premiere), but that also requires a PC with a lot of memory and a pretty fast processor.

If you can go the Mac route, definitely iMovie for the types of projects that you were describing in the question.

jimlynch
Vote Up (14)

Here's a list of video editing software that's a good place to start. This includes freeware as well as proprietary software.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_video_editing_software

SilverHawk
Vote Up (12)

Thanks for the suggestion, I will look into that!

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