Panel: Future CIOs will have careers blending non-tech roles with traditional IT duties

Employee retention and corporate image are some of the issues that CIOs will have to consider as they manage technology

By , IDG News Service |  IT Management

Next-generation CIOs will have to consider how technology affects other corporate departments as well as handle traditional IT management functions, especially those accompanying mobile device management and greater data analysis, according to panelists who spoke at the MIT Sloan CIO Symposium in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Consumer mobile devices have entered the enterprise and CIOs need to support them while considering their security risks, said speakers who participated in a Tuesday discussion on the challenges facing future CIOs.

IT departments can "either support [the bring-your-own-device trend] or be a receiver of the fallout," said Rob Stefanic, CIO of Sensata Technology.

Sensata "set the tone without understanding the consequences" of mobile devices after adopting a cloud-based collaboration tool in 2007 and having employees access it with hardware besides a desktop.

The company, which makes sensors and controls for industrial use, practices a mobile security plan that focuses on ensuring the IT department can mitigate breach risks without locking down devices or blocking employee data access.

Mobile security decisions, though, impact more than how a company protects its assets, said Scott Penberthy, managing director, technology, at accounting firm PriceWaterhouseCoopers.

A clunky user interface on a mobile device can cost an employee time and ultimately result in business going to a competitor, said Penberthy, who also served as CTO of Apple mobile app development company AppOrchard.

"Those decisions are impacting how people view your company, how people interact with your business and the cycle time of productivity," he said.

And the image presented by a company's technology and website become important when recruiting and retaining workers, panelists said.

Stefanic is involved with Sensata's college recruiting and finds that candidates are asking about the technology the company is using, raising questions on the impression the company's IT creates, he said.

"Branding becomes extremely important and technology really helps to set the tone for a new entrant and starts to form an opinion of us," Stefanic said.

For Penberthy, IT's role is "all about putting the data in the hands of people the way they are used to it."

This means allowing younger employees to use mobile devices and teaching more senior workers how they can expand content on their smartphone screens, he said.

Information generated from studying structured and unstructured data will prove valuable to marketing professionals, and future CIOs will help develop relationships between the IT and marketing departments, the panelists said.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

Ask a Question
randomness