Do you remove EXIF data from images that you post online?

delia25

Ok, this isn't exactly a work related question, although I guess if could be if I added "at work" to the end of my question. :-)

Anyway, my husband thinks I am totally paranoid because I always strip EXIF data (the information attacked to image files that tells things like when and where they were taken) before posting online. I figure if I want someone to know more info, I will tell them. Am I a particularly paranoid person, or do other people also do this?

Topic: Internet
Answer this Question

Answers

3 total
jimlynch
Vote Up (14)

I don't think it's a bad thing for you to do, it's certainly your choice. So if you are more comfortable doing it then I think you should continue.

Those who aren't familiar with how to remove EXIF data should see this article:

How to remove EXIF Data
http://mansurovs.com/how-to-delete-exif-data

"Now that I explained you what EXIF Data is and showed you how you can view EXIF on JPEG files, I will now show you how to remove EXIF Data completely or partially from JPEG files."

dthomas
Vote Up (13)

I usually don't.  If it is something personal that has my wife and kids in it, I am more likely to remove it, but even then I often do not.  The expectations I used to have for a reasonable level of privacy have shifted a bit over the years.  It seems easier to just assume anything online is posted on the bulletin board at your office, your kids' school, your wife's gym, etc.  If I want something to stay private, it stays in my house and doesn't go on a computer/tablet/iphone.  The problem is that it is more and more difficult to do that. 

dthomas
Vote Up (11)

I usually don't.  If it is something personal that has my wife and kids in it, I am more likely to remove it, but even then I often do not.  The expectations I used to have for a reasonable level of privacy have shifted a bit over the years.  It seems easier to just assume anything online is posted on the bulletin board at your office, your kids' school, your wife's gym, etc.  If I want something to stay private, it stays in my house and doesn't go on a computer/tablet/iphone.  The problem is that is more and more difficult to do that. 

Ask a question

Join Now or Sign In to ask a question.
Yahoo has acquired online video streaming company RayV with the aim of distributing content to more people, particularly via mobile devices.
Building on its successful platform for monitoring the performance of IT systems, New Relic now offers a service that collects and analyzes app performance data to provide more information about how effectively businesses are serving their customers.
Will we see anything sillier than a Kickstarter campaign to make potato salad? Wait, don’t answer that
Amazon.com has asked the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration permission to test drones outdoors for use in its Prime Air package delivery service.
MonkeyParking, an app that lets people bid on public parking spaces, said Thursday it will suspend its service in San Francisco to avoid a potential lawsuit from the city attorney.
IBM, Microsoft, Red Hat and other IT vendors are lending a hand to Google to help build software that enterprises could use to manage their computerized workloads in the cloud.
Microsoft's price cuts for some Office 365 plans was an attempt to keep momentum on its software-by-subscription push, an analyst said.
In wake of psychological experiment, group challenges users to take a Facebook break and find out if it makes them happier.
Oracle's massive annual OpenWorld conference isn't happening until late September, but the vendor recently unveiled details of nearly 1,800 sessions planned for the event that on balance paint a comprehensive picture of what its customers, partners and competitors can expect.
Microsoft is coming out with new hardware and cloud management features for its StorSimple hybrid storage offering that promises lower costs and better data protection.
randomness