Qwest aims for clearer digital video

By Jessica Hall, InfoWorld |  Networking

Movie theaters would need direct broadband connections and new projection systems. Movie directors and producers also have to endorse a new digital medium rather than celluloid film.

"You have to deal with legacy technology and people who have to produce it. Directors and cinematographers happen to like the technology they've been using for 100 years. It's like a true audiophile arguing for vinyl over a CD," Woodrow said.

QWEST SEES STRONGEST DEMAND AMONG BUSINESSES

Qwest Digital Media expects to be profitable by the end of 2001. Woodrow declined to disclose Qwest Digital Media's revenues, but said the unit had the "potential to double or triple each year for several years."

Most of that growth will be driven by the strong demand among corporations for video services. Industry analysts expect the market for WWebcasting and video-on-demand services alone to reach $11 billion by 2005.

"We're focused on the business-to-business world ... we're going to focus on people who have real applications and real money who we can serve," Woodrow said.

High-speed, clear connections could help corporations transmit investor conferences over the Internet, train employees in far-flung locations, or provide customer service or product information to their clients, the company said.

Qwest Digital Media competes against small boutique firms that provide video production services, as well as larger "rich media" companies such as Akamai Technologies Inc. , Digital Island Inc. , and Web-hosting providers like Digex Inc. and Genuity Inc.

Copyright (c) 2000 Reuters Limited. Reuters content is the intellectual property of Reuters Limited. For additional information on other Reuters Services please visit the Reuters public web site - http://www.reuters.com.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

Ask a Question
randomness