Top 10: Windows 7 launch, FCC vote, Sun job cuts

By , IDG News Service |  Windows, net neutrality, Sun

This was one of the busiest news weeks in recent memory, with the Windows 7 launch, the U.S. Federal Communications Commission moving toward net neutrality rules, big job cuts at Sun Microsystems, the Web 2.0 conference and a flurry of financial reports, among other noteworthy happenings.

Top 10

Photo by Silvio Tanaka

1. Everything you need to know about Windows 7: As the headline says, everything you need to know about Windows 7 (and then some) can be found at the link. The official launch was anticlimactic, given all that had been reported well before Thursday, but the arrival of Windows 7 still tops the list of news this week.

2. FCC takes first step toward net neutrality rules, FAQ: What's the FCC vote on net neutrality all about? and Net neutrality could lead to inexpensive, high-quality broadband services for businesses : And there's a lot more to sink your teeth into with the coverage of the FCC's vote to consider whether it should impose regulations on Internet service providers regarding applications and services that the providers allow, impose rate limits on or outright ban users from accessing on broadband networks. Network World's Tim Greene compiled a helpful FAQ and also wrote an interesting piece about the possible ramifications of net neutrality on broadband services for businesses.

3. Sun to cut 3,000 jobs as Oracle awaits merger approval and EU slams Oracle's cooperation in Sun investigation: The shoe dropped this week for Sun Microsystems employees, with word that 3,000 of them worldwide will lose their jobs. That was no surprise, really, given that Oracle CEO Larry Ellison said recently that Sun is losing US$100 million as the companies await European approval for Oracle's planned takeover of Sun. Meanwhile, the European Commission seemingly placed blame for approval delay squarely on Oracle, publicly chastising the company for its lack of cooperation in the Commission's investigation into possible competition issues.

4. Microsoft and Google sign deals with Twitter and Google, Microsoft search rivalry heats up: The Web 2.0 Summit is one of the busier, and more interesting, industry conferences, and this time around it also produced a breaking-news duel between Microsoft and Google. First, Microsoft announced that it has signed collaboration deals with Twitter and Facebook. A few hours later, Google announced it has a collaboration deal with Twitter.

5. Apple reports $1.67 billion quarterly profit on record Mac, iPhone sales, Wall Street Beat: Amazon, Apple shine in heavy earnings week and Microsoft profits fall less than expected: Recession-proof Apple made a breathtaking amount of money last quarter, considering the state of the global economy. It was otherwise a busy week for earnings reports, with Amazon saying that it did well, too, while Microsoft's profit slipped less than had been expected.

6. Sergey Brin laments Yahoo's Microsoft search deal: Google cofounder and President of Technology Sergey Brin made a surprise appearance at Web 2.0, offering his perspective on a variety of topics, including Yahoo's search deal with Microsoft.

7. Symantec: Rogue security software is big business for crooks: "Scareware" popups that give alarming warnings to users that their PCs are infected pose an increasing threat, Symantec said. Some of the popups try to lure users to download useless software, but in other cases they lead the unsuspecting to infect their computers with malicious software.

8. Apple overhauls iMac line, with 21.5-, 27-inch models: Apple rolled out a major update of its iMac desktop line -- just in time for the holiday shopping season.

9. Canonical takes on Windows 7 with Ubuntu 9.10 RC: Windows 7 wasn't the only OS news, with Canonical making available the release candidate of Ubuntu 9.10 on the same day that Microsoft hosted its launch events. The Ubuntu release is dubbed Karmic Koala.

10, Mozilla unblocks one sneaky Microsoft add-on: Last weekend, Mozilla blocked two buggy Microsoft add-ons to Firefox and then early this week started unblocking them. The interesting aspect of this news, though, was the back-and-forth that apparently ensued between Mozilla and Microsoft.

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