Top five scripting languages on the JVM

Groovy and JRuby lead a strong field, with Scala, Fantom, and Jython following behind

By Andrew Binstock, InfoWorld |  Open Source, Groovy, java

Anyone who has followed software development tools during the last decade knows that the term "Java" refers to a pair of technologies: the Java programming language and the Java Virtual Machine (JVM). The Java language is compiled into bytecodes that run on the JVM. Through this design, Java delivers its vaunted portability.

The language and the JVM, however, have been increasingly moving in opposite directions. The language has grown more complex, while the JVM has become one of the fastest and most efficient execution platforms available. On many benchmarks, Java equals the performance of binary code generated by compiled languages such as C and C++. The increasing complexity of the language and the remarkable performance, portability, and scalability of the JVM have created an opening for a new generation of programming languages. These languages lack Java's syntax overload (often referred to disparagingly as its "ceremony") -- that is, the amount of excess code that needs to be cranked out before the code that does the actual work can be written -- but take advantage of the JVM.

[ Eclipse PDT, NetBeans, NuSphere PhpED, and Zend Studio lead a capable field of IDEs for Web developers. See "InfoWorld review: Eight PHP power tools" | With WYSIWYG prototyping environments and preconfigured graphical components, rapid Web development tools can help you build applications faster -- but with less flexibility. See "InfoWorld review: Tools for rapid Web development" ]

In this article, I examine a handful of these languages, comparing and contrasting them, and identifying the needs they satisfy particularly well. I limit myself to the JVM languages that are free and open source. The closed source, commercial world, surprisingly, has few comparable offerings. The one standout is Cold Fusion Markup Language, which is part of Adobe's Cold Fusion Web application development environment.


Originally published on InfoWorld |  Click here to read the original story.
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