Oracle updates its Linux kernel with new advanced file system

Oracle's Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel Release 2 supports the cutting-edge Btrfs file system

By , IDG News Service |  Open Source, Linux, Oracle

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Oracle has updated the kernel of its Linux distribution to take advantage of the latest Linux advances, the company announced Tuesday.

It also previewed a number of new features, including a module for the widely anticipated DTrace Linux debugger.

Version 2 of Oracle's Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel, the company's version of the Linux kernel that powers its Oracle Linux distribution, is the first to be based on version 3.0 of the Linux mainline kernel, released last July.

"Many of the improvements in the kernel come from within the mainline kernel," said Sergio Leunissen, Oracle's vice president for Linux product management and business development. "We do a lot of testing on the mainline kernel with [heavy duty] workloads relevant for our customer base."

With this update, Oracle Linux will be among the first Linux distributions to offer full support for the new Btrfs file system, which could help organizations manage large amounts of information. It will also put into production the latest kernel advances such as better memory management and better support for virtualization.

Linux 3.0 was the first version of the kernel to support the Btrfs next-generation file system. Btrfs can manage up to 16 exabytes of data in one namespace, which should ease the burden of data management for organizations with that much material. It provides the ability to automatically back up data and a way to do RAID backups without external controllers. It also is optimized for solid-state hard drives, rather than the drives based on spinning disks.

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