WWDC keynote highlights

By Philip Michaels, Macworld |  Personal Tech, Apple, WWDC

A new iPhone, a renamed OS, and iPhone versions of iMovie and iBooks--it all adds up to a busy Monday for Apple. And that means a special edition of the Macworld Podcast to break down all the news from Monday's Worldwide Developers Conference keynote.

Fresh off their live blog of Steve Jobs's keynote, Macworld editorial director Jason Snell and senior associate editor Dan Moren join me to talk about all things iPhone. Senior editor Dan Frakes, who also attended Monday's keynote, rounds out our panel.

Download Episode #198

AAC version (22 MB, 43 minutes)

MP3 version (15.7 MB, 43 minutes)

Show Notes

The iPhone took center stage during Monday's keynote--particularly, the unveiling of the brand new iPhone 4. We take a close look at the phone's new features, as Dan and Jason talk about their hands-on time with the device, which is scheduled for release on June 24.

When iPhone 4 does arrive, it will have a new operating system--which also has a new name. We spend some time talking about the rechristened iOS 4, though to be honest, much of what we saw Monday was first revealed back in April at the iPhone 4 OS preview event.

Other news to come out of WWDC on Monday includes the mobile version of iMovie, an update to iBooks that will introduce the e-reader to the iPhone, and more information about iAd. If you find that pictures are worth a thousand words, be sure to check out our slideshow of the WWDC keynote. And stick with Macworld for more news coming out of WWDC.

To subscribe to the Macworld Podcast via iTunes 4.9 or later, simply click here. Or you can point your favorite podcast-savvy RSS reader at: http://rss.macworld.com/macworld/weblogs/mwpodcast/


Originally published on Macworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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