Angry Birds Devs Angry At Android Fragmentation

Rovio Mobile is crafting a more lightweight version of its Android app to accommodate all the Android versions.

By Daniel Ionescu, PC World |  Personal Tech, Android, angry birds

However, it's not only software differences that make developing for Android harder for software developers. Various screen resolutions, different processor speeds, different amounts of RAM, and customized Android interfaces all play a big part in the Android fragmentation. These differences are also probably at the core of Angry Birds' performance problems on many Android phones.

At the other end of the spectrum is Apple's iOS and its integrated ecosystem, where the Angry Birds game originated, and the platform that propelled the game into stardom. Apple CEO Steve Jobs was not hesitant to rip into Google's fragmentation issues with Android, characterizing it as "a mess for both users and developers."

Google's plan to end Android fragmentation includes detaching many standard apps (like Mail, Maps, Photos) from the main OS, and update them independently via the Android Market. However, resolving Android fragmentation will see more hurdles ahead, as Google is preparing to launch Android 3.0 in a few weeks, adding yet another version of its OS on the market.

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Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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