Apple's biggest 5 blunders of 2010

Apple screwed up big time in 2010 despite its phenomenal success.

By Ian Paul, PC World |  Personal Tech, Apple, IOS

July came and went, but the white iPhone never materialized on store shelves, and users began to pine for the elusive device. White iPhones were later spotted in New York and in the hands of British actor Stephen Fry. The white iPhone 4 became so desirable that a cottage industry of DIY solutions popped up. A teenager in Queens, NY got into trouble for selling white iPhone 4 conversion kits out of his parent's home after it was discovered he was making $130,000 off his home-based business, according to The New York Post .

Now the white iPhone 4 is said to be coming next spring, but many wonder if Apple won't scrap the white iPhone 4 altogether and try again with a white iPhone 5 next summer.

AirPrint

When Apple released the beta version of AirPrint, a feature in iOS 4.2, the company said it would enable users to print from the iPad or iPhone to any network printer. The AirPrint feature would be able to send a print job to an AirPrint-compatible printer or to non-compatible printers through a Mac or PC.

At the time, Apple told PC World there would be "no difference between the way AirPrint would work on a printer that supports Apple's new AirPrint printing architecture (like ePrint printers from HP) or one that is connected to a Mac or a PC."

But shortly before iOS 4.2's release in November, Apple quietly pulled shared printer support from AirPrint. The company also scrubbed most of its Website of any mention of shared printer support, and didn't release a statement about why it had decided to pull the AirPrint feature. Some developers said shared printer support worked perfectly, and were surprised to see it pulled from iOS 4.2. The reasoning behind the fate of AirPrint shared printer support remains a mystery.

iPhone 3G vs. iOS 4


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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