The early adopter's guide to 3D

We did some experimenting to find the answers to some 3D mysteries.

By Patrick Miller and Tim Moynihan, PC World |  Personal Tech, 3D, consumer electronics

The selection of 3D content available today is better than it was last summer--the last time we checked in--but not by much. 3D Blu-ray discs are still the easiest way to put your 3D TV to work--assuming that you have a 3D Blu-ray player or a Sony PlayStation 3. Unfortunately for consumers, we continue to see vendors lock down high-profile movies as key elements of exclusive bundle-only releases. The 3D Blu-ray version of Avatar, for example, is available only as part of a Panasonic 3D starter kit that includes two pairs of glasses for about $400.

Sports fans can check out ESPN 3D, which currently shows scheduled sports events in 3D (consult the ESPN 3D schedule) and aims to begin showing nonstop 3D video content on February 11. The channel is available on most large cable/satellite TV providers, including AT&T Uverse, Comcast, and DirecTV.

Elsewhere, the 3D TV offerings are underwhelming. Comcast's 3D Events channel, available in some areas, is reserved for broadcasting special 3D events, and DirecTV has a channel devoted to its paid 3D video-on-demand service. 3D TV owners hoping for more programming options may benefit from a joint venture between Sony, IMax, and the Discovery Channel called 3Net, which aims to launch in early 2011. Until it arrives, though, there's not much beyond ESPN 3D and whatever you can find on Blu-ray.

The State of the 3D Union

At this stage, making a major 3D hardware purchase looks safer for anyone who is interested primarily in shooting 3D still images and viewing them with minimal fuss on a 3D TV. The .MPO format is well on its way toward becoming the standard 3D still-image file type, and more and more 3D TVs will offer native support for .MPO files. If you want to buy a 3D-capable still camera right away, you can probably do so without incurring major buyer's remorse down the road, as long as the camera shoots .MPO-format 3D stills. The most impressive still-image output we've seen to date came from the Fujifilm FinePix Real 3D W3.

Material from 3D Blu-ray discs or content providers' channels aside, video is much harder to play back if you don't directly connect the capture device to the TV. The presence of too many disparate file types and too little native video file support makes recommending one camcorder over another extremely dicey. If you're willing to connect your camera or camcorder to your 3D TV via HDMI each time you want to watch high-quality 3D video, it will work--but the process is cumbersome, and the "3Dness" of the images may vary.


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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