MacBooks will make Light Peak a standard before its time

No one needs the speed, unless someone else has one first

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  • - no more white MacBook (Apple goes back to two lines of 13" inchers)

    - 16 GB SSD mSATA drives on all models to store the system

    - Core i3 and third USB port on the 13" model

    - Matte screen option on the higher-end 13"

    - Option to replace the SuperDrive with a SSD on the 15 and 17" models

    - HD screens on all models : 1440x900 on the 13", 1680x1050 on the 15"

    - 200 to 300 grams lighter : 1.8 kg for the 13", 2.3 kg for the 15", 2.65 kg for the 17"

    - Better battery life : 12 hours on the 13", 10 hours on the 15"

    - 8 GB of RAM on the 17"

-- MacGeneration

A couple of things occur to me:

1. for the most secretive company in the IT industry, an awful lot of Apple info gets out from under the Cone of Silence through that network of relentless Mac fanboi diggers.

2. There is an awful lot of USB, ATA, SATA, Firewire, HDMI and who knows what else out there that would have to be replaced if there was any kind of wholesale conversion to Light Peak.

3. Under normal conditions there's no way most PC buyers would stand the extra expense unless the need for ridiculously high data transfer was much more clear and immediate than it is, so Light Peak would end up stuck as a connector between virtual-server hosts, links to SANs, to virtual I/O and other abstruse uses.

4. If any reasonably useful technology shows up on not one laptop, but a whole line of them, from a company whose users are desperate to be able to point to a clear technical superiority of their platform over the PC, and therefore sells far more than it really should, that technology is going to spread into low-demand applications much more quickly than it would otherwise.

If Light Peak does show up on many or most of the MacBook Pros, it will become a standard option on mid- to high-end Windows laptops and home- or consumer-oriented storage devices within a year. At Apple-like premium prices, of course.

Kevin Fogarty writes about enterprise IT for ITworld. Follow him on Twitter @KevinFogarty.

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