PC vs. Mac isn't a choice any more; neither is Mac vs. Mac

Smartphones and tablets have changed what it means to be a 'PC'

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Which is what makes the assumption that relatively small changes are really important are misleading. Apple's "record" gain of .37 percent in global usage share is makes an impressive-looking chart compared to Windows' slow decline.

If you don't look at the analyses and projections from more traditional analysts, you might jump on Apple's bandwagon and miss the boat on other options.

IDC predicts the iPhone's sales will continue to increase, but it will be overtaken not only by Android, but also by Windows Phone 7 by 2015.

The smartphone market will grow 49 percent in that time. So, again, if you're looking mainly at sales, that's the rising tide that lifts all boats.

If you're in IT, it just means that if you bet on just one smartphone OS – the one that's in the lead right now – you'll be swamped before 2015 by the weight of "computers" running operating systems you don't support to access the network.

PC vs Mac arguments have been going on for a long time. They'll probably continue.

These numbers just make it clear that what people mean by "Mac" isn't just a PC made by Apple, and PC isn't just something running Windows.

PCs, Macs, smartphones and tablets are all legitimate client machines for enterprise networks, and IT doesn't have the option of just choosing one or the other to support.

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