Cybook Opus Wins Featherweight E-Reader Crown

Though it's on the expensive side, the Cybook Opus is a great e-book reader for anyone who doesn't care about frills.

By Yardena Arar, PC World |  Personal Tech, ebook, eReader

If you've been waiting for a no-frills e-book reader that's scarcely heavier than an iPhone, check out the Cybook Opus from Bookeen. Available in an array of colors, and weighing just 5.3 ounces and measuring less than half an inch thick, the Opus wrests the e-reader portability crown from the Sony Reader Pocket Edition; unfortunately, its $199 price tag (as of February 18, 2010) is a bit larger.

And despite its appealing design, the Cybook Opus falls short on features that you'd get at a somewhat higher price on the Amazon Kindle 2 or (for that matter) on the Barnes and Noble Nook.

The Cybook Opus's superskinny profile (6.0 by 4.2 by 0.4 inches) and featherlight weight aren't its only distinguishing features: It also has a built-in accelerometer that shifts the text's orientation every time you turn the device 90 degrees (alternatively, you can press a button to reorient text). Though the large-format Amazon Kindle DX has an accelerometer, too, on the Opus, no matter which way you hold it, page turning is impressively intuitive, whether you use the four-button navigational wheel or the pair of line-shaped buttons on the device's plastic case.

The navigational wheel and the select button it surrounds guide you through context-sensitive menus that pop up when you press a button to the right of the wheel (a Back button sits to the left of the wheel). The menus have a fairly simple design; you can customize them (and your books) by choosing any of 12 gradually increasing font sizes. And because the Cybook Opus supports the securable ePub e-book format, which almost all major booksellers except Amazon use, you can read a vast array of commercial content as well as the enormous Google e-book library. (The Opus also supports PDF, HTML, and .txt documents.) Its 1GB of internal memory can accommodate hundreds of books; but it has a microSD Card slot, too, in case you need more space.


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question