Steer your career to the cloud

By Beth Schultz, Network World |  On-demand Software, cloud careers, IT career

"The day of focusing only on things in the enterprise are coming to an end, and IT professionals need to have skills to leverage systems that they don't own and that are outside the enterprise's control," says David Linthicum, CTO at Blue Mountain Labs, a cloud consulting firm, and cloud computing blogger at InfoWorld, a Network World sister publication.

"They need to understand how platforms are changing, how to get access to storage and compute on demand and how to leverage infrastructure and platform as a service where needs dictate those," he adds. And this goes for executives as well as staff.

"Executives who are innovative and willing to take a few risks are the ones who will succeed with the advent of cloud computing. They'll look like heroes as they take infrastructure costs down by running systems outside the firewall on the Amazon or Google cloud," Linthicum says. "And rank-and-file IT professionals will discover it's advantageous to their careers to learn about those cloud systems before they appear in the enterprise; they'll be rewarded for that - finding cloud-knowledgeable people is difficult today."

That creates a seller's market, as it were. "There are probably 50 cloud jobs chasing one candidate. That'll drive salaries up and people's value within the company will go up, too, plus they'll be able to hold onto positions for longer periods of time," he adds.

Job titles are even starting to morph to capture the growing importance of the cloud to enterprise IT strategy, says Pat O'Day, CTO at cloud host BlueLock.

"Where once we saw network architects we're starting to see cloud architect," he cites as one example. "This change implies that the person is now responsible not only for the architecture of the existing network but also connectivity and associated things to external cloud providers."

"I'm seeing cloud project manager and cloud strategist within some of enterprises, but more so within companies selling software as services," Linthicum says.

Case in point is Darren DelDuco, who is vice president of cloud services at Aprimo, an independent software vendor that develops and sells packaged software for marketers. With such a title, it's not hard to figure that DelDuco is responsible for the cloud-based infrastructure and operations supporting the company's hosted and on-demand offerings.

"I oversee all aspects of application delivery for those two product lines, including the business, pricing and go-to-market strategies relative to those cloud services-based offering," he explains.

What's in a name


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

On-demand SoftwareWhite Papers & Webcasts

See more White Papers | Webcasts

Answers - Powered by ITworld

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question
randomness