Facebook redesigns: A long history of pointless backlash

The latest outrage over its redesign is just one of many backlashes that Facebook has endured

By Jared Newman, PC World |  On-demand Software, Facebook

October 2009: Facebook redesigns its home page again, introducing an algorithm to decide which status updates should be displayed first, rather than relying on chronological order. Some events that were removed from timelines early that year are added back, including friend acceptances and relationship statuses. In other words, Facebook makes concessions after the big backlash of March 2009.

But users are still not satisfied, and more than one million of them protest to change Facebook back to the way it used to be. Some users beg Facebook to bring back chronological order for news feed updates.

November 2010: Facebook quietly reduces the font size of news feed updates. Users complain on Twitter. Facebook responds -- on Twitter. Weird.

December 2010: Facebook overhauls profile pages, most notably by boiling down user information into a summary at the top of the page, and by adding a strip of photos underneath the short summary. Comments on Facebook's blog post are almost entirely negative.

June 2011: Facebook tests a "Happening Now" feature on some users, showing the latest status updates in a separate feed on the right side of the screen. Early guinea pigs hated it. Some of them formed a "Facebooks 'Happening Now' Haters Group" to commiserate.

The Happening Now feature was a precursor to the News Ticker, which Facebook rolled out to all users this week.

I wonder what would happen if Facebook suddenly changed its design back to the way it was in 2004.

Follow Jared on Facebook, Twitter or Google+ for even more tech news and commentary.


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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